Brazilian Clown Tiririca Candidate to Federal Deputy For the Republic Party (pr) Participates in a Campaign Event in a Neighborhood in Sao Paulo Brazil 23 September 2010

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Shutterstock

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Tirica has been within the Chamber of Deputies since 2010

Knowledgeable clown in Brazil who ran for congress and received by an enormous margin says he is not going to stand once more in 2018.

Francisco Everardo Oliveira Silva, higher referred to as Tiririca, is coming to the tip of his second time period within the Chamber of Deputies.

He complained that he was certainly one of solely eight out of greater than 500 lawmakers who repeatedly turned as much as periods.

Tiririca stated he was “ashamed” of his colleagues’ behaviour and would return to being a full-time clown.

In his first speech since he was elected in 2010, Tiririca, whose stage identify means Grumpy, stated he was saddened by what he had seen within the decrease home of congress.

“Everybody is aware of that we’re paid effectively to work, however not everybody does work. There are 513 deputies, solely eight come repeatedly. And I am a kind of eight, and I am a circus clown.”

In his eight-minute speech, he admitted that he had “not achieved a lot” throughout his nearly seven years as a lawmaker, however he stated: “No less than I used to be right here.”

Tiririca has been very talked-about with voters. Campaigning beneath the slogan “It might’t get any worse”, he received 1.three million votes in 2010, greater than every other candidate in that election.

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AFP

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Tiririca’s marketing campaign slogan was “Vote Tirica, it will probably’t worsen!”

His win was not with out controversy, with newspapers claiming he couldn’t learn or write, a authorized requirement for holding workplace.

However after a court docket dominated that he met the essential literacy necessities, he took up his seat and was re-elected in 2014 with essentially the most votes in Sao Paulo state.

Tiririca is just not the one Brazilian with a unfavorable view of lawmakers.

Belief in Brazilian politicians has plummeted at a time when the leaders of each the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate are beneath investigation for alleged corruption, as are dozens of senators and deputies.

A Datafolha opinion ballot printed on Wednesday [in Portuguese] recommended that 60% of Brazilians described the work of members of Congress as “bad” or “very bad”.